Ixcela Balance

5-HTP + Vitamin B6

$69.99 for a 90-day supply
($23.33 per month)

One of the most diverse strain of probiotics on the market!

Free shipping in the U.S. for orders $150 or more.

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Product Details

Ixcela Balance is specially formulated to support below-optimal serotonin levels. This blend of 5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan) and vitamin B6 may assist with emotional health, sleep disturbances, digestion, and muscle pain.*

5-HTP is an amino acid that converts to serotonin in the human body. Serotonin is important for feelings of well-being, mood regulation, sleep, and digestion.

Vitamin B6 is necessary for immune health, mental alertness, energy, and nervous system health. Studies show that vitamin B6 supports the synthesis of neurotransmitters such as dopamine and serotonin, which are involved in motivation, mood, digestion, sleep, and memory.

Ixcela Balance can be taken at any time of day, but if you are looking to improve sleep quality, consider taking Ixcela Balance 30 minutes before bed.

Abstain from taking 5-HTP supplements, including Ixcela Balance, if you are taking carbidopa or antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Please consult your physician before following this supplement recommendation.

As with any dietary supplement, consult your health care practitioner before using this product, especially if you are pregnant or nursing, anticipating surgery, taking any medications on a regular basis, or otherwise under medical supervision.

Ixcela supplements are formulated to exclude:

Gluten Wheat Soy Yeast Corn
Nuts Fish GMO Sugars Added Colors
Preservatives Crustacean Shellfish Eggs Dairy and Lactose Artificial Sweeteners

Ixcela supplements are produced at an FDA-registered, GMP-compliant facility and contain no harmful fillers. They are vegetarian and are not tested on animals.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

For adults only. Adults take one (1) capsule per day with a meal. Ixcela Balance can be taken at any time of day, but if you are looking to improve sleep quality, consider taking Ixcela Balance 30 minutes before bed.

Warning: Keep out of reach of children.

Caution: As with any dietary supplement, consult your health care practitioner before using this product, especially if you are pregnant or nursing, anticipating surgery, taking any medications on a regular basis, or otherwise under medical supervision.

Abstain from taking 5-HTP supplements, including Ixcela Balance, if you are taking carbidopa or antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) or monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Please consult your physician before following this supplement recommendation.

Storage: Keep tightly closed. Store in a dry place and avoid excessive heat.

5-HTP (5-hydroxytryptophan)

  • Ceci, F., et al. “The Effects of Oral 5-Hydroxytryptophan Administration on Feeding Behavior in Obese Adult Female Subjects.” Journal of Neural Transmission, vol. 76, no. 2, 1989, pp. 109-117. doi: 10.1007/bf01578751. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/2468734.
  • Cangiano, C., et al. “Effects of Oral 5-Hydroxy-Tryptophan on Energy Intake and Macronutrient Selection in Non-Insulin Dependent Diabetic Patients.” International Journal of Obesity and Related Metabolic Disorders: Journal of the International Association for the Study of Obesity, vol. 22, no. 7, 1998, pp. 648-654. doi: 10.1038/sj.ijo.0800642. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9705024.
  • Birdsall, T. C. “5-Hydroxytryptophan: a Clinically-Effective Serotonin Precursor.” Alternative Medicine Review: A Journal of Clinical Therapeutic, vol. 3, no. 4, 1998, pp. 271-280. www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9727088/.

B6

  • Wolf, Hans. “Studies on Tryptophan Metabolism in Man: The Effect of Hormones and Vitamin B6 on Urinary Excretion of Metabolites of the Kynurenine Pathway: Part 1.” Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, vol. 33, 1974, pp. 11-87. https://doi.org/10.3109/00365517409104201.
  • Wolf, Hans. “Studies on Tryptophan Metabolism in Man: The Effect of Hormones and Vitamin B6 on Urinary Excretion of Metabolites of the Kynurenine Pathway: Part 2.” Scandinavian Journal of Clinical and Laboratory Investigation, vol. 33, 1974, pp. 89-182. https://doi.org/10.3109/00365517409104202.
  • Yess, Norma, et al. “Vitamin B6 Depletion in Man: Urinary Excretion of Tryptophan Metabolites.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 84, no. 3, 1964, pp. 229-236. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/84.3.229.
  • Kowlessar, O. Dhodanand et al. “Abnormal Tryptophan Metabolism in Patients with Adult Celiac Disease, with Evidence for Deficiency of Vitamin B6.” Journal of Clinical Investigation, vol. 43, no. 5, 1964, pp. 894-903. doi: 10.1172/JCI104975. https://dm5migu4zj3pb.cloudfront.net/manuscripts/104000/104975/JCI64104975.pdf.
  • Midttun, Øivind, et al. “Low Plasma Vitamin B-6 Status Affects Metabolism through the Kynurenine Pathway in Cardiovascular Patients with Systemic Inflammation.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 141, no. 4, 2011, pp. 611-617. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.110.133082.
  • Rios-Avila, Luisa, et al. “A Mathematical Model of Tryptophan Metabolism via the Kynurenine Pathway Provides Insights into the Effects of Vitamin B-6 Deficiency, Tryptophan Loading, and Induction of Tryptophan 2,3-Dioxygenase on Tryptophan Metabolites.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 143, no. 9, 2013, pp. 1509-1519. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.113.174599.
  • Rios-Avila, Luisa, et al. “Metabolite Profile Analysis Reveals Association of Vitamin B-6 with Metabolites Related to One-Carbon Metabolism and Tryptophan Catabolism but Not with Biomarkers of Inflammation in Oral Contraceptive Users and Reveals the Effects of Oral Contraceptives on These Processes.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 1, 2015, pp. 87-95. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.201095.
  • Hankes, L. V. et al. “Tryptophan Metabolism in Humans with Various Types of Anemias.” Blood, vol. 32, no. 4, 1968, pp. 649-661. https://doi.org/10.1182/blood.V32.4.649.649.
  • Deac, Oana, et al. “Serum Immune System Biomarkers Neopterin and Interleukin-10 Are Strongly Related to Tryptophan Metabolism in Healthy Young Adults.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 146, no. 9, 2016, pp. 1801-1806. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.116.230698.
  • Hansen, C.M., et al. “Vitamin B-6 Status of Women with a Constant Intake of Vitamin B-6 Changes with Three Levels of Dietary Protein.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 126, no. 7, 1996, pp. 1891-1901. https://academic.oup.com/jn/article/126/7/1891/4723639.
  • Majewski, M., et al. “Overview of the Role of Vitamins and Minerals on the Kynurenine Pathway in Health and Disease.” Journal of Physiology and Pharmacology, vol. 67, no. 1, 2016, pp. 3-19. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27010891.
  • Ciorba, Matthew. “Kynurenine Pathway Metabolites: Relevant to Vitamin B-6 Deficiency and Beyond.” American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 98, no. 4, 2013, pp. 863-864. doi: 10.3945/ajcn.113.072025. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4498264/pdf/ajcn984863.pdf.
  • Christensen, MHE, et al. “Inflammatory Markers, the Tryptophan-Kynurenine Pathway, and Vitamin B Status after Bariatric Surgery.” PLoS One, vol. 13, no. 2, 2018. doi: 10.1371/journal.pone.0192169. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29401505.
  • Deac, Oana, et al. “Tryptophan Catabolism and Vitamin B-6 Status Are Affected by Gender and Lifestyle Factors in Healthy Young Adults.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 145, no. 4, 2015, pp. 701-707. https://doi.org/10.3945/jn.114.203091.
  • Eastman, Clifford and Guilarte, Tomas. “Vitamin B-6, Kynurenines, and Central Nervous System Function: Developmental Aspects.” The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, vol. 3, no. 12, 1992, pp. 618-632. https://doi.org/10.1016/0955-2863(92)90081-S.
  • Danielski, L.G., et al. “Vitamin B6 Reduces Neurochemical and Long-Term Cognitive Alterations After Polymicrobial Sepsis: Involvement of the Kynurenine Pathway Modulation.” Molecular Neurobiology, vol. 55, no. 6, 2018, pp. 5255-5268. doi: 10.1007/s12035-017-0706-0. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28879460.
  • Schaeffer, Monica C., et al. “Dietary Excess of Vitamin B-6 Affects the Concentrations of Amino Acids in the Caudate Nucleus and Serum and the Binding Properties of Serotonin Receptors in the Brain Cortex of Rats.” The Journal of Nutrition, vol. 128, no. 10, 1998, pp. 1829-1835. https://doi.org/10.1093/jn/128.10.1829.
Guilarte, Tomas. “Vitamin B6 and Cognitive Development: Recent Research Findings from Human and Animal Studies.” Nutrition Reviews, vol. 51, no. 7, 1993, pp. 193-198. https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1753-4887.1993.tb03102.x

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