Ixcela Biome Support

17-Strain Probiotic + Prebiotic

$109.99 for a 90-day supply
($36.66 per month)

One of the most diverse strain of probiotics on the market!

Free shipping in the U.S. for orders $150 or more.

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Product Details

Ixcela Biome Support contains 30 billion colony forming units (CFU) and 17 different bacteria strains, making it one of the richest probiotics on the market. Biome Support was designed to support optimal levels of metabolites indole-3-propionic acid, indole-3-acetic acid, indole-3-lactic acid, tryptophan, tyrosine, serotonin, and total indoxyl sulfate.

Ixcela Biome Support uses an enteric capsule to protect the probiotic strains so that they can be delivered to the areas of the gut where they are needed most. This means that unlike many retail-store probiotics and the probiotics found in yogurts, kombucha, and fermented pickles, the bacterial strains in Ixcela Biome Support are able to pass through acidic regions of the stomach and make their way to the lower small intestine and large intestine to do their work. Biome Support also includes prebiotics (FOS and inulin), which help gut bacteria grow and thrive.*

Did you know that not all probiotics are created equal? Find out what makes a good probiotic and why Ixcela Biome Support stands apart from the rest!

As with any dietary supplement, consult your health care practitioner before using this product, especially if you have an immune deficiency or histamine intolerance, are pregnant or nursing, anticipating surgery, taking any medications on a regular basis, or are otherwise under medical supervision.

Ixcela supplements are formulated to exclude:

Gluten Wheat Soy Yeast Corn
Nuts Fish GMO Sugars Added Colors
Preservatives Crustacean Shellfish Eggs Dairy and Lactose Artificial Sweeteners

Ixcela supplements are produced at an FDA-registered, GMP-compliant facility and contain no harmful fillers. They are vegetarian and are not tested on animals.

* These statements have not been evaluated by the Food and Drug Administration. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure, or prevent any disease.

Probiotics consist of live, beneficial bacterial microorganisms that can help repopulate the gut microbiome, especially after insult from antibiotics, stress, or poor diet. Ideally, probiotic supplements consist of a variety of different families (strains) of bacteria and/or yeasts. It is also important to have enough of these bacteria, which is why at least 25 billion colony forming units (CFU) is recommended. Ixcela Biome Support has 30 billion CFU.

Ixcela’s Probiotic Blend

Prebiotics serve as food for bacteria and can help them grow and thrive. The human body is not capable of digesting FOS and inulin fibers; however, bacteria can use the fibers as a substrate (food source) to live on. These same fibers can also assist in keeping bowels regular.

For adults only. Adults take one (1) capsule per day with a meal. If taking antibiotics: It is best to wait 2 hours after taking an antibiotic before taking Ixcela Biome Support.

After starting a new probiotic supplement, it is normal to notice mild GI symptoms; however, symptoms usually subside within a week or two. If your symptoms continue for several weeks or if you are very uncomfortable, consider reducing the number of days per week that you take the supplement. Consider reducing the supplement frequency to every other day for two weeks, and then begin to take the supplement every day.

Warning: Keep out of reach of children.

Caution: As with any dietary supplement, consult your health care practitioner before using this product, especially if you have an immune deficiency or histamine intolerance, are pregnant or nursing, anticipating surgery, taking any medications on a regular basis, or are otherwise under medical supervision.

Storage: Keep tightly closed. Store in a dry place and avoid excessive heat.

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